Ancestor Researchers Discover Potential for HIV vaccine

A recent breakthrough in the medical world started to give good news to the people living with HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus). The researchers seemed to be getting closer to a potential vaccine used to fight HIV, one of the most deadly viruses, which until now has not found a cure.
The study, published in Cell and Science Journals recently claimed to have found an immunogen molecule, known as EOD-GT8 60mer, which is effective against HIV. The results of tests conducted on rats showed that the molecule may help prevent infection.
"These results are very spectacular," said Dennis Burton, PhD, chair of TSRI Department of Immunology and Microbial Sciences, was quoted in a news release Scripps.
If the usual way approach immunize against the virus is to use dead or inactivated virus to stimulate the immune response by activating the cells B. As for this case, HIV is able to evade the immune system by mutating when it infects the body. Therefore, the researchers tried testing this EOD-GT8 60mer to mice, rabbits and primates. And the result, of all of the models used, EOD-GT8 60mer effective in providing an antibody response that is used to block HIV.
Next, the researchers will investigate other immunogens that can work with the EOD-GT8 60 mer to contribute to HIV vaccines to produce a more viable vaccine. Long-term goal of this research is to design a vaccine that can activate the production of antibodies capable of preventing the binding of HIV infection.

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